Strawberry Yogurt Popsicles for Canada Day

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Summer may start on June 21, but here in NS, Canada Day is the real kickoff to summer. The kids (and teachers!) are done with school and the weather is finally starting to get hot. This year, “grading day” isn’t until June 30th, so July 1st really is the true start to summer. The forecast looks like it might finally be the start of summer weather too!

As a kid, Canada Day meant parade watching with my cousins. The parade went right by their grandmother’s house, so we’d sit on curb, catching candy and looking for people we knew on the floats. These days, we usually celebrate Canada Day with a BBQ with family and friends.

I’ve been on the lookout for a fun Canada Day treat for a while. I’ve had a million ideas, but they either required materials I couldn’t find (there are no maple leaf cookie cutters or sprinkles to be had in this county!) or took more time than I had available. I finally came up with these tasty popsicles. They’re perfect for kids but yummy for adults too. The popsicles are fun and festive, but since they’re made with real fruit and yogurt, they’re a healthier option. When the kids have been running around the BBQ munching chips and hot dogs all day, it’s nice to have a dessert option that’s not full of sugar. They’re great for everyday snacking too!

The only ingredients you absolutely need are strawberries and yogurt. Everything else is there for a boost of flavour or fun – sugar, lemon juice, vanilla and a strawberry fruit roll-up.

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Wash the berries, cut off the stems and chop them up. You need about 2 cups, which will take most of a 1 lb clamshell.

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Toss the berries into a medium-sized pot, and cook over low heat for 12 to 15 minutes.

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By this point, the berries should have released their juice and be pretty much broken down.

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Puree the berries with an immersion blender. You can also use a regular blender, or mash the mixture with a fork or potato masher.

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If you have picked-this-morning fresh local berries, you may not need any sweetener. Local strawberries are still a distant dream here; spring was so late and so cold that I think it’ll be a few weeks yet. These berries definitely left some of their flavour behind on their journey from California, so I tossed in a bit of sugar. A squeeze of lemon juice helps to brighten the flavour.

If your berries are still in the pot, transfer them to a measuring cup or bowl with a pouring spout – it will make the next step much easier.

These are my popsicle molds – courtesy of the dollar store.

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The Disney princess molds were cheaper than the regular ones, so I figured why not! You can find popsicle molds just about anywhere at this time of year. You could also use paper cups, or one of these ideas from The Kitchn if you don’t have molds.

I wrote the recipe for my molds, which are fairly small and hold just under 1/3 of a cup of filling. If you have bigger molds or want to make more than 4 pops, I suggest doubling the recipe.

Pour the strawberry filling into each mold, filling it about 1/3 of the way. For my molds, that’s about 1 ½ tablespoons, but you can just eyeball it. Wipe any drips from the inside of the molds with a paper towel.

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Place the mold on a flat surface in the freezer and freeze for 1 – 2 hours, or until relatively firm.

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Non-dairy yogurt is my latest obsession. I haven’t eaten yogurt since I started reducing my dairy intake several years ago and I’ve really missed it. I could never find non-dairy yogurt here and I figured it would be fake and gross. I started noticing a few brands at Atlantic Superstore not long ago and finally bit the bullet and tried it. The soy yogurt is good…the coconut yogurt is delicious! It has a fair bit of sugar, so it’ll be a treat rather than an everyday staple, but I’m enjoying it.

You can use any type of yogurt you’d like for the middle layer. A thinner, runnier yogurt will fill the mold more evenly. I wouldn’t recommend using a thick yogurt like Greek yogurt – it will taste fine but not look as pretty. I used soy yogurt as the coconut is pretty thick (and because I wanted to eat all of the coconut stuff!) I added a bit of sugar and vanilla to punch up the flavour a bit – that’s totally to taste.

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If you want to make the pops true Canadian flags, you can add a maple leaf. To make the leaves, cut a square of strawberry fruit roll-up. Using a small, sharp knife, cut a stem on the bottom and three rectangular leaves, kind of like a plus sign.

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Cut two small triangles into the end of each leaf to make the points.

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Once the first layer is frozen, press the maple leaves against the side of the mold, just above the strawberry filling.

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Add 1 ½ to 2 tablespoons of yogurt to each mold, so each is about 2/3 full.

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If you’ve put in the fruit roll-up leaves, be sure to add enough yogurt to cover them.

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Wipe any drips and freeze for another hour. You don’t want to freeze too long at this point because you need to be able to insert the sticks.

Pour the rest of the strawberry mixture into each mold, filling it to the top. Insert the sticks, and freeze overnight.

To unmold, run hot water briefly over each mold, and carefully pull the popsicle out. Serve immediately.

These are perfect on a hot summer day, or to finish off a BBQ.

Canada Day Smoothie Pops

If you want the maple leaf to “pop” and be a bit more visible, you can stick the fruit roll-up cutout on after unmolding.

This pop had the leaf frozen into it:

Canada Day Pops

This one was stuck on after:

Bluenose Baker Canada Day Pops

Helpful hint – when serving popsicles to the kiddos, a cupcake liner helps to catch some of the drips!

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We enjoyed these popsicles last night as we cheered on Team Canada at the Women’s World Cup – what a devastating loss!

What are you making for Canada Day celebrations this year?

Strawberry Yogurt Popsicles for Canada Day

  • Servings: 4
  • Print

Ingredients:

  • 1 lb strawberries (2 cups chopped)
  • 1 teaspoon lemon juice
  • 1 ½ tablespoons sugar (or to taste)
  • ½ cup vanilla yogurt
  • 1 tablespoon sugar (or to taste)
  • ¼ teaspoon vanilla (or to taste)

Directions:

Wash, stem and chop berries.

Place the berries into a medium-sized pot, and cook over low heat for 12 to 15 minutes. By this point, the berries should have released their juice and be pretty much broken down.

Puree the berries with an immersion blender, regular blender or potato masher.

Add lemon juice and sugar to taste. Transfer berries to a measuring cup or bowl with a pouring spout.

Pour the strawberry mixture into each popsicle mold until it’s 1/3 of the way full.

Place the mold on a flat surface in the freezer and freeze for 1 -2 hours, or until relatively firm.

If desired, add sugar and vanilla to yogurt and stir.

If you want to make the pops true Canadian flags, you can add a maple leaf. To make the leaves, cut a square of strawberry fruit roll-up. Using a small, sharp knife, cut a stem on the bottom and three rectangular leaves, kind of like a plus sign. Cut two small triangles into the end of each leaf to make the points.

Once the first layer is frozen, press the maple leaves against the side of the mold, just about the strawberry filling.

Add 1 ½ to 2 tablespoons of yogurt to each mold, so each is about 2/3 full. If you’ve put in the fruit roll-up leaves, be sure to add enough yogurt to cover them.

Freeze for another hour.

Pour the rest of the strawberry mixture into each mold, filling it to the top. Insert the sticks, and freeze overnight.

To unmold, run hot water briefly over each mold, and carefully pull the popsicle out. Serve immediately.

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7 thoughts on “Strawberry Yogurt Popsicles for Canada Day

    • bluenosebaker says:

      Glad you found me! Peeled is such a great way to find other bloggers – I love connecting with other Canadians. I just checked out your site and I see that you’re a teacher too! Happy Canada Day!

      Like

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