Snickerdoodles

Snickerdoodles

Snickerdoodles! Not only are they tasty to eat, they’re fun to say! If you’re not familiar with snickerdoodles, they are similar to a sugar cookie, but are rolled in cinnamon sugar. They end up with a crackly top and a chewy centre, and are a favourite non-chocolate cookie around here.

I first encountered snickerdoodles in a Babysitter’s Club book as a kid. Was anyone else into that series as a kid? I had a ton of the books, and read many more from the library. In one of the books, the babysitting charges wanted to make cookies for their big sister, since she was busy and stressed. Snickerdoodles were her favorites. I’m pretty sure in the book the cookie-baking ended with a huge mess for the babysitter to clean up – but these cookies don’t make too much of a mess!

I have no idea where the name “snickerdoodle” originated! A brief google search seems to indicate that the term comes either from a German word or simply from a New England tradition of giving whimsical names to cookies and treats. The name tends to get slapped onto any sort of cinnamon sugar cookie (or cupcake, cheesecake, even oatmeal and coffee creamer!) These are what I consider true snickerdoodles – they puff in the oven but fall when you take them out, giving them a crackled top and a chewy bite.

You’ll need white sugar, cinnamon, flour, cream of tartar, baking soda, butter, shortening and eggs. The original recipe recommends using unsalted butter and adding salt, but I rarely have unsalted butter on hand, so I use salted and ditch the additional salt.

DSCF4125edited

Cream of tartar is the key ingredient – what makes snickerdoodles snickerdoodles and not just cinnamon sugar cookies. It gives them a subtle tangy flavour. It also reacts with the baking soda to help the cookies rise (baking powder is actually a mix of baking soda and cream of tartar.) You can find it in the baking aisle or near the spices. It’s often used to stabilize beaten egg whites, for meringues or other such recipes. I don’t use it for much other than these cookies, but it doesn’t cost much or take up much room, so it’s good to have on hand!

DSCF4139edited

Start by combining ¼ cup of the sugar with the cinnamon in a small bowl. Set the cinnamon sugar aside for now.

DSCF4129edited

Whisk together the flour, cream of tartar, baking soda and cream of tartar in a medium bowl. If you’re using unsalted butter, mix the salt in too.

DSCF4142edited

Place the butter, shortening and sugar in the bowl of a stand mixer and beat on medium speed until light and fluffy.

DSCF4146edited

Beat in the eggs one at a time.

DSCF4153edited

Gradually add the flour, mixing on low speed until it’s all incorporated. Scrape down the sides of the bowl as necessary.

DSCF4155edited

You’ll end up with a soft dough.

DSCF4156edited

Use your hands or a cookie scoop to roll the dough into balls.

Using a large cookie scoop (1 ½ to 2 tablespoons) will give you large, thick cookies that are a bit softer. A smaller cookie scoop (1 tablespoon) will give cookies that are a bit smaller and thinner. I suggest you try a pan of each and see what you like better. I’m known for varying the size of my cookies – sometimes you want a big one and sometimes you want a smaller one! Just make sure to keep all of the cookies on one sheet the same size, and keep a close eye on the baking time. Smaller cookies will generally require less time. Some recipes bake much better at one particular size, and I’ll always indicate that.

Drop each ball into the cinnamon sugar and roll it around until it’s completed coated.

DSCF4158edited

Line your baking sheets with silicone baking mats or parchment paper. Have I mentioned how much I love my silicone sheets? I bake almost everything on them – from cookies to sweet potato fries. I have a Silpat and a knock-off from Stokes and I don’t notice a difference in the results.

Place cookies 2 inches apart on the prepared baking sheets.

DSCF4160edited

Bake one sheet at a time at 375° until the edges are set and just beginning to brown. The centres will be soft and puffy, the tops will be cracked and between the cracks should still look raw and underdone. This will be anywhere from 8-12 minutes depending on your oven and the size of your cookies.

DSCF4164edited

Remove cookies from the oven and let cool on the baking sheets for 10 minutes, then remove to a wire rack to cool completely.

DSCF4163edited

Enjoy a bite of cinnamon sugar perfection! These are a great cookie for the holidays, but we enjoy them year round. And they’re just as much fun to eat as they are to say!

Snickerdoodles by the Bluenose Baker

Makes about 2 dozen large cookies or up to 4 dozen smaller ones.

Snickerdoodles

  • Servings: 2 to 4 dozen cookies
  • Print

Adapted from Our Best Bites

Ingredients:

  • 1 ¾ cups granulated sugar, divided
  • 1 tablespoon ground cinnamon
  • 2 ½ cups all-purpose flour
  • 2 teaspoons cream of tartar
  • 1 teaspoon baking soda
  • ½ teaspoon table salt (omit if using salted butter)
  • ½ cup butter, softened (unsalted is preferred, omit salt if using salted butter)
  • ½ cup shortening
  • 2 large eggs

Directions:

Preheat oven to 375°.

Combine ¼ cup of the sugar with the cinnamon in a small bowl and set aside.

Whisk together the flour, cream of tartar, baking soda, cream of tartar and salt (if using) in a medium bowl.

Place the butter, shortening and sugar in the bowl of a stand mixer and beat on medium speed until light and fluffy.

Beat in the eggs one at a time.

Gradually add the flour, mixing on low speed until it’s all incorporated. Scrape down the sides of the bowl as necessary.

Use your hands or a cookie scoop to roll the dough into 1 or 2 tablespoon balls.

Drop each ball into the cinnamon sugar and roll it around until it’s completed coated.

Line your baking sheets with silicone baking mats or parchment paper. Place cookies 2 inches apart on the prepared baking sheets.

Bake one sheet at a time at 375° until the edges are set and just beginning to brown. The centres will be soft and puffy, the tops will be cracked and between the cracks should still look raw and underdone. This will be anywhere from 8-12 minutes depending on your oven and the size of your cookies.

Remove cookies from the oven and let cool on the baking sheets for 10 minutes, then remove to a wire rack to cool completely.

Makes about 2 dozen large cookies or up to 4 dozen smaller ones.

Advertisements

2 thoughts on “Snickerdoodles

Leave a Reply

Fill in your details below or click an icon to log in:

WordPress.com Logo

You are commenting using your WordPress.com account. Log Out / Change )

Twitter picture

You are commenting using your Twitter account. Log Out / Change )

Facebook photo

You are commenting using your Facebook account. Log Out / Change )

Google+ photo

You are commenting using your Google+ account. Log Out / Change )

Connecting to %s